An Unusual Personal Finance Insurance Tip

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Here is An Unusual Personal Finance Insurance Tip that I never would have thought was a good idea until I read this article by Dailyfinance. I posted some of it here but make sure you check out the full article as to why this makes good sense for your personal finances.

Believe it or not, this actually makes sense to have a high deductible. On the one hand you pay less money for the premium, and since most people don’t use their insurance anyway the odds are in your favor. Of course you definitely shouldn’t raise it too much where IF something happens you can’t afford it. But odds are if you raise it a bit, the amount you save will cover the higher deductible should you need it later.

If your deductible doesn’t hurt, it’s not high enough,” says Kevin Foley, an insurance broker at PFT&K Insurance Brokers in Milltown, New Jersey. “Why so high? Because insurance is for disasters — things that make you drop to your knees and thank God you have insurance. It’s not for maintenance.

But the biggest savings is the fact that a low deductible makes you want to use it much more frequently! And  Kevin goes on to say:

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The problem with that is most insurance companies allow you two strikes in three years and then they cancel you, replacement insurance is unbelievably expensive, and you’re stuck with it for three years before anyone will talk to you. Plus, you can’t hide from your losses, because they all share information.

So it seems all in all this is a healthy plan to put into place to potentially (somewhat risky) save some money! The article explains this in much more detail!

You can save up to 41 percent in home insurance premiums if you raise your policy’s deductible — but there is risk.

Insurers will charge you less in premiums if you hike your deductible, although the amount you save depends on what state you live in, and often works in their favor by putting more financial burden on the homeowner in the case of such problems as fire or flood.

For example, if a small fire causes $4,500 in damage to your home and your policy has a $5,000 deductible, you’re on the hook for the entire cost of repairs.

Since savings vary so much from state to state, consumers need to consider the bottom line before increasing deductibles.

“Since savings vary so much from state to state, consumers need to consider the bottom line before increasing deductibles,” says Laura Adams, senior analyst at InsuranceQuotes.com. “While switching from a $500 deductible to a $5,000 deductible sounds appealing because it lowers home insurance premiums by an average of 28 percent, it could be a risky move for consumers who don’t maintain that much in savings.”

Of course, homeowners can raise their deductibles less. Boosting a policy’s deductible to $2,000 from $500 saves a homeowner 16 percent, on average, according to InsuranceQuotes.com.

Some states are more generous on their homeowner insurance rates than others. North Carolina for example, allows homeowners to save 41 percent on their policies by raising out-of-pocket deductibles. Rhode Island (26 percent) and Florida (23 percent) residents can also save big.

“If your deductible doesn’t hurt, it’s not high enough,” says Kevin Foley, an insurance broker at PFT&K Insurance Brokers in Milltown, New Jersey. “Why so high? Because insurance is for disasters — things that make you drop to your knees and thank God you have insurance. It’s not for maintenance.”

Consequently, you shouldn’t use your insurance unless you absolutely have to, Foley adds. “Having a low deductible lures you into wanting to use the insurance when you have minor problems,” he says. “What’s $250, if the insurance pays the other $1,750?”

“The problem with that is most insurance companies allow you two strikes in three years and then they cancel you,” Foley explains. “Replacement insurance is unbelievably expensive, and you’re stuck with it for three years before anyone will talk to you. Plus, you can’t hide from your losses, because they all share information.”

Some homeowners agree that raising insurance deductibles was good for them.

“We significantly increased our home deductible and saved 32 percent on our homeowner’s and our auto insurance,” says Mark Zoril, founder of PlanVision, a Plymouth, Minnesota-based financial services firm.

Zoril’s process was straightforward. “I reached out to six different firms and could have reached out to many more — Farmers, American Family, Liberty Mutual, Travelers and AAA … I imaged copies of all of our policies with Allstate and sent them to each office. I told them to just match the coverage and provide a quote.’

Zoril ended up choosing Liberty Mutual and raising his homeowner’s policy deductible to $10,000. “We decided to treat our home insurance as coverage for a catastrophic event,” he explains. “This reduced our premium a lot. [But] our risk is that our house or roof will suffer severe damage in a storm or weather event.”


Go try and raise your deductibles – just a little bit and see if it makes sense for you!


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Alexander_Price

I'm here to help change the way people are taught about finances. I have created a place where I look for the best information possible that I believe will significantly benefit my readers. I want this to be beneficial for everyone! Lets change the world together!

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